Four Reasons Why You Should Not Hire a Friend or Relative

Whether you are in a human resources or management position or you own your own business, at some point a friend or family member may come to you seeking employment. Before making the decision to hire this person, it is important to note and consider a few of the disadvantages that will come along with hiring him or her:

Automatic Expectations of Favoritism and Nepotism

Despite the fact that you have informed your friend or family member of company policies and no matter how many times this person tells you to treat him or her like any other employee, an automatic expectation of favoritism is absolutely guaranteed. Regardless of promises made, in the back of this person’s mind, he or she is thinking that this is a pretty sweet gig and that they are likely to get away with much more than fellow employees. Whether it be pay rate, scheduling, or following strict guidelines, this person will believe that you will put their needs ahead of those of other employees. In order to meet the expectations, the hr manager should try payboy services in the business. There will be automatic completion of the guidelines and expectations through the hiring of payboy. 

Personalization

You will very likely encounter situations in which your friend or family member will use your knowledge of his or her personal circumstances in order to get ahead of others, such as asking for all of the overtime hours because you know how rough things have been lately.

Getting Too Personal

If your friend or family member enjoys chatting with co-workers, your name is bound to come up in conversation eventually. Employees may even attempt to learn more about your personal life by digging for information through your unknowing friend or relative.

Negative Changes in Your Relationship

As all adults are already aware, disagreements happen – and unfortunately, all of the promises in the world simply can not prevent this from happening. Disagreements at work will negatively affect your relationship with this person, and may even affect your relationships with mutual friends or family members via word of mouth. Imagine how uncomfortable and absolutely obnoxious it would be for a mutual friend or family member to confront you about your professional responsibilities and decision-making skills.

All in all, hiring a friend or family member is just not a good idea. Problems such as disagreements will quickly arise, affecting your relationships and reflecting poorly on you as a professional.

So the next time you find yourself in a situation in which a friend or family member turns to you in need of employment, politely explain that it is against company policy to hire a family member or personal acquaintance – whether or not it actually is, as a small white lie is quite understandable in this situation.

Instead of offering employment, volunteer to write a letter of recommendation or to be a personal reference in order to help this person in their current job hunt. But whatever you do, do not hire him or her!